Week Five

The PLP class of 2022 poses for a photo in front of the Oklahoma City skyline.
Week Four
July 15, 2022
Portrait of PLP class of 2022 in regalia made by PLP house mother Margaret Zientek.
Week Six
July 21, 2022

July 8, 2022 – Friday

Golfing

We got to tour the golf course and learn its inner workings. We also got to ride around in golf carts and pet some really cute cats.

“It was a lot of fun. There was a lot of groundskeeping addressed, as well as upkeep of grass and lakes. The best parts of the tour were when we were having fun in our golf carts in between the sessions of actual learning.” – David Harty

Arena Department Session

The Arena hosts a variety of events such as concerts, graduations, and recently the Potawatomi Fire Basketball Team. We were given a tour of the Arena and learned what it takes to make these events run.

July 9, 2022 – Saturday

Sac and Fox Powwow

“The Sac and Fox Powwow felt more festive than the Potawatomi version, however it also felt less traditional. The Potawatomi Powwow had an aspect of culture and heritage in it, whereas the Sac and Fox felt more like it was a celebration. However, I feel the only reason I see it this way is because I am Potawatomi and I understand and notice the small details throughout the Potawatomi Powwow. One thing I did really enjoy about the Sac and Fox powwow was how they supported local craftsmen and women by helping vendors set up shops. In addition I also enjoyed the intense use of color and decoration by many of the dancers, there were these beautiful headdresses made of eagle feathers and precious metals. I feel more connected to the Potawatomi Powwow but the Sac and Fox Powwow opened my eyes to many new styles and concepts and I have come to appreciate them.” – Jaden Tarter

July 11, 2022 – Monday

Cultural Teaching

“We talked a lot about how we can stay involved in our Native American culture even when we are far from Shawnee, such as going to powwows for other tribes. We can dance at these intertribal powwows and there are ways that we can learn how to dance even if we can’t come to powwows or go to the Family Reunion Festival each year. There are differences between each tribe, but the most important thing is to just stay involved in any way we can. Not everyone will be dancers, but there are many other ways that people can stay connected to their culture and practice our native traditions. It is essential to practice these traditions in a respectful way and to respect the traditions of other tribes that we may come across.” – Sophia Carney

July 12, 2022 – Tuesday

Rural Water District #3

We got to tour the different plants the RWD #3 operates and their headquarters. 

Meeting with Chairman and Vice Chairman

We had the opportunity to sit down with the Chairman and Vice Chairman to learn about the history of CPN’s tribal leadership and their wisdom on a variety of topics.

July 13, 2022 – Wednesday

We had language class in the morning. We learned how to say prayers in Potawatomi. We spent the majority of this day working on our final projects and catching up on other assignments.

July 14, 2022 – Thursday

Rodeo came to town!

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Eligibility

 

You must meet all of the following eligibility criteria to be considered for the Potawatomi Leadership Program:

 

Program participants are selected without regard to race, color, religious creed, ancestry, gender, sexual orientation, disability, or national origin. Although the only restrictions for applying are meeting the eligibility criteria listed above, please consider whether you are comfortable meeting program conditions with or without any special accommodations. The conditions of this program include but are not limited to the following:

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Details

 

Tribal members who are 18-20 years old are selected for the six-week program based on academic qualifications, a series of essays, and a letter of recommendation. Arriving before the annual Family Reunion Festival, students spend their workdays visiting tribal directors and hearing employees explain their role. Between departmental sessions, students tour tribal enterprises and attend board meetings. In the evenings and on weekends, students connect culturally by attending language classes, participating in tribal ceremonies, and learning traditional crafts. Additionally, students who have not yet received a Potawatomi name will have the opportunity to do so. By the end of the program, the students have gained a comprehensive knowledge of individual tribal components as well as how they fit into the larger puzzle of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation.

As potential leaders of the tribe, students not only learn how the Tribe operates but also undergo extensive leadership training. Students begin the summer by taking an assessment to discover their individual strengths, and recurring workshops help them understand how best to develop those skills. Weekly talking circles offer a space to process their experience and tackle complex issues such as the intricacies of cultural identity, the qualities of effective leadership, and the promotion of tribal engagement. Additionally, Citizen Potawatomi Nation government officials such as the Chairman, Vice-Chairman, and legislators share their unique perspectives on tribal leadership with the students.

Besides attending scheduled events and sessions, Potawatomi Leadership Program participants will be expected to write three short papers. At the end of the program, students leave their own mark on the Tribe by applying this abstract knowledge to a practical project, for which they design a creative way to tangibly enhance, develop, or add to the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. In a final program presentation, students have the opportunity to share their final reflections and completed projects with tribal leadership. (Check out the final presentations here.)

Together, these components make up the Potawatomi Leadership Program. Students leave the program equipped with the knowledge and tools to remain engaged in the Tribe. For some, the experience will serve as preparation for future tribal governance, which strengthens the hope that the Citizen Potawatomi Nation’s sound leadership will continue into future generations.

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Travel

 

The Citizen Potawatomi Nation covers the cost of round-trip travel for all program participants. Depending on where the student will be coming from, this will mean either airfare or mileage reimbursement.
Dennette Summerlin will work with the students to schedule all travel.

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Stipend

 

Participants receive a weekly scholarship of $60 as well as a $1,680 scholarship upon completion of the program.

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Local Transportation

 

When at the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, local transportation will be provided. This includes all scheduled sessions and events. As a group, students may choose to seek other entertainment options such as the movies or bowling, and transportation to and from those activities will be provided when possible. However, students will not be able to bring their own vehicles to the program for any reason.

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Food

 

The Citizen Potawatomi Nation boasts a full-service grocery store near the students’ living quarters, FireLake Discount Foods. Groceries for all meals will be furnished at FireLake and covered by the Tribe. Students will shop as a group for these groceries. On most evenings, students will work together to plan and prepare meals for the entire group in the Sharp House kitchen. However, should students choose to eat out at restaurants – they will be responsible for these outside costs.

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Housing

 

During the six weeks, program participants stay together in “The Sharp House,” a spacious property owned by the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. Students will share rooms and bathrooms based on gender.
The Sharp House boasts a number of amenities, which include two large-screen televisions, a pool table, and an outdoor pool.

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Healthcare

 

All accepted students will be required to create a medical file with the Citizen Potawatomi Nation Clinic. As tribal members, the students can visit this clinic and
receive medical attention at no cost to them if any medical issues should arise during their stay.

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Professional Development
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Eligibility

 

You must meet all of the following eligibility criteria to be considered for the Potawatomi Leadership Program:

 

Program participants are selected without regard to race, color, religious creed, ancestry, gender, sexual orientation, disability, or national origin. Although the only restrictions for applying are meeting the eligibility criteria listed above, please consider whether you are comfortable meeting program conditions with or without any special accommodations. The conditions of this program include but are not limited to the following:

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